Medicine

  • Views: 338 A Joint Solution: How Green Tea Can Diminish the Effects of Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Dr. Saleh Ahmed at the University of Toledo's College of Pharmacy is researching the impact of Green Tea extracts on Rheumatoid Arthritis.

  • Views: 312 Hit the Road "JAK": Understanding Cancer Cell Migration

    Reporter Ashley Traynum visits  Dr. Maria Diakonova in her lab at the University of Toledo to explore the reactions between JAK2 and PAK1 molecules, and learn how they may impact the movement of breast cancer cells.

  • Views: 406 The Sweet Life: How chocolate may help prevent stroke damage

    Researchers at the University of Toledo Medical Center are studying how substances like dark chocolate and ginkgo biloba can help reduce the effects of stroke damage in patients.  We find out the differences in dark chocolate and milk chocolate by investigating the production process, and examine why people believe that chocolate could be a "miracle drug."

  • Views: 501 Hearing, With Help : The technology behind Cochlear Implants

    The science and technology that brings hearing to people without that ability is explored through a surgically implanted, electronic device – the cochlear implant.  We interview and show actual patients, and explore their experiences.    Interviews include those from Health Sciences and Human Services, with input from the Disability Studies Center.  Interviews with Lori A. Pakulski, young people with implants and the Cleveland Clinic.

  • Views: 358 Autism Innovations

    Sherry Moyer from UT’s Center for Excellence in Autism discusses the need for early diagnosis to set young people on a strong treatment path for a better future as adults.  Not all young people are diagnosed early, however, and face special challenges.  An innovative new program called Agility Angels, pairs up canines and young people with Autism for dog training experiences.  The teens build confidence and learn how to interact on a higher level of engagement.

  • Views: 509 Cutting Edge-ucation: Educational technology meets medicine and the marketplace

    Multimedia learning at its very best is practiced and invented at the Center for Creative Instruction at UTMC.  Software engineers, designers and faculty create amazing ways of teaching through technology.  The Anatomy Revealed project is our subject to explore the range of ways CCI  can bring a topic to life!  Designers from CCI and anatomists talk about the axis where medicine, technology and product development meet. 

  • Views: 609 Hunting Hypertension

    Blood Pressure Regulation may have a genetic marker and Dr. Bina Joe is looking for it.  Her Genomics Lab at UTMC has identified 16 genome regions for study and is getting closer to a discovery.  Amanda Patton explains genetic mapping and markers that pre-dispose some people to certain disorders and maladies.  How does identifying these markers lead to treatment that can turn around high blood pressure?

  • Views: 438 Lives Revitalized: Treatments for Parkinson's

     

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic movement disorder that effects nearly one million people in the US. The disease can cause slowness of movement, tremors and loss of balance and progressively worsens over time. Doctors and researchers in the University of Toledo's Department of Neurology are helping improve the lives of patients with Parkinson's disease. Katie Colosimo reports.

    Read more
  • Views: 587 Exercise Your Mind: Computers Enhance Cognitive Ability

    As we age, our brains have less cognitive ability, which can lead to other problems including emotional distress, family and financial challenges.  Researchers are devising computer simulation programs that can help increase and improve cognitive function amongst older adults.  Paired with physical activity, the simulations are showing remarkable results. 

  • Views: 276 Shaping Reality

    VR goes useful.  The application of Virtual Reality in video gaming is well-known, but how can VR be used to teach?  The team at the Center for Creative Instruction and the University of Toledo Medical Center are exploring how 3D graphics, database design, big servers, artificial intelligence and some cool software merge to create exciting learning environments.

  • Views: 370 Heavy Burden

    Pediatrician Joan Griffith wrote a paper when at Harvard, and continues her research at UTMC, about the factors that lead to obesity in kids today.   UTMC pre-doctoral fellow, Terry Hinds, is running a study with the National Institute of Health to study genetic factors of obesity

  • Views: 476 Never Ending Chain of Love: Altruistic Kidney Donation

    Reporter Mariana Joy speaks in-depth with a nationally-recognized leader in the field of kidney donation surgery: Dr. Michael Rees.  An explanation of the work of the Alliance for Paired Donation and the Human Donation Science Program at the University of Toledo Medical Center.  Science of the surgery, science of the computer models that match members of donor pairs and create a chain for donation. 

  • Views: 495 Viral Science: H1N1 under the microscope

    The H1N1 flu virus threatens the health of millions of Americans.  Beyond the headlines, the science of the flu virus and vaccine development tells us much more about how to stay well and informs us on how the medical community deals with the possibility of an epidemic.  Find out why this virus poses unique threats to certain population groups and why it is more of a danger than the seasonal flu.

  • Views: 668 Stop The Bleeding: Avoiding Blood Vessel Leakage During Trauma

    When blood vessels become weak or are put under trauma, they become porous and blood cells leak out – flooding surrounding tissue and putting a person’s life in jeopardy.  Faculty at the University of Toledo have developed a new liquid compound polyethylene glycol (PEG) – modified albumin.  Dr. Joseph Shapiro, Dr. Regheb Assaly, and Dr. J. David Dignam developed this medical breakthrough and are licensing its use through ADS Biotechnology.  Dr. Jeffrey Gold, provost, UT College of Medicine, talks about the process taking a drug from lab to the pharmacy shelf.

  • Views: 534 Anything You Can Do, I Can Do Better: Gender and the science of sport

    Men and women have different physical characteristics, strengths and weaknesses, yet both sexes like to participate in the same sports and recreational activities.  What are the differences in short term strength vs long term endurance? Are there specific activities that give one gender an edge over the other in certain activities?  Student Carmen Quatman is working on a unique project that tries to get at the heart of why female athletes get certain injuries. 

  • Views: 407 Forensic Fact and Fiction: The Reality of Forensic Investigation

    Law enforcement meets medical science in order to solve crimes through the collection, preservation and analysis of physical evidence.  UT is a recognized leader in the field of Criminal Justice and the UTMC campus area is home to to Lucas County Coroner offices.  Featuring DNA and blood evidence, fingerprinting, bone identification, fiber and even sound analysis.  Breanne Democko gets to the facts behind forensics with the people who uncover the evidence every day.

  • Views: 486 Today's Bionic Man: Using science to keep people moving

    We can rebuild him. The Six Million Dollar man could be a reality today, as man and machine become one for better health and adaptation. Artificial limbs and devices, photo biotherapy for faster and better wound healing, and even a device to analyze the effectiveness of your golf swing! Plugged-In host Shaun McDonald finds talks with Dr. Vijay Goel about the future of medicine.

  • Views: 543 No need for needles: A better way for diabetics to check their sugar

    Currently the method for measuring blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes, is to draw blood by pricking a finger. With 15 million diabetics in the US testing glucose levels each day, there must be a better way – and there is. The Glucose Eye Scanner, developed at UT is a non-invasive and easy-to-use scanner that looks at the liquid between the lens and cornea to give an instant read-out. Roquel Cunningham talks to the developer of the scanner, and experts from UT's College of Business Administration to explain the path from lab to store shelf.

  • Views: 509 Cutting Edge-ucation: Educational technology meets medicine and the marketplace

    Multimedia learning at its very best is practiced and invented at the Center for Creative Instruction at UTMC.  Software engineers, designers and faculty create amazing ways of teaching through technology.  The Anatomy Revealed project is our subject to explore the range of ways CCI  can bring a topic to life!  Designers from CCI and anatomists talk about the axis where medicine, technology and product development meet. 

  • Views: 438 Lives Revitalized: Treatments for Parkinson's

     

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic movement disorder that effects nearly one million people in the US. The disease can cause slowness of movement, tremors and loss of balance and progressively worsens over time. Doctors and researchers in the University of Toledo's Department of Neurology are helping improve the lives of patients with Parkinson's disease. Katie Colosimo reports.

    Read more
  • Views: 710 Keeping Tabs

    Supply chain management is all about KNOWING. Where things are. How many do you have. How many do you need? When do you need them? This tracking technology is now being used in the healthcare industry to insure quality care. Katie Colosimo examines healthcare's new front on infection.

  • Views: 491 The Complete Picture

    Medical professionals are using connective technologies to bring the images of MRI's, X-rays and CT Scans together for better and clearer images.  Doctors can now see irregularities that were once overlooked.  David Mette explores medical imaging 2.0

  • Views: 460 Prescription for Safety: Testing medications for better results

    Before any medicine shows up on the shelf at your local pharmacy, it must undergo a series of tests before it receives approval from the FDA.   Amanda Patton finds out how drug compounds are developed in the lab, how drug trials are conducted for safety and side effects, and asks ‘who is paying for all of this? And do they have an agenda?

  • « Back
  •