Frontline: Egypt in Crisis

Frontline: Egypt in Crisis

Tuesday, September 17 at 10:00 p.m.

Less than three years after the popular uprising that led to President Hosni Mubarak’s ouster, and just one year after Egypt’s first free and fair elections, the democratically elected government has been overthrown and the Egyptian military is running the state.

And the Muslim Brotherhood—the secretive, long-outlawed Islamist group that came out of the shadows to win the presidency in June 2012—is once again being driven underground, its members killed and arrested in an army-led campaign to wipe it off the map.

Were the Brothers ever really in charge? Or was the Egyptian “deep state”—embedded remnants of Mubarak’s police force, Supreme Court and, most of all, military—in control all along?

In a special "Frontline" report, veteran Middle East correspondents Martin Smith (“Obama’s War,” “Return of the Taliban,” “Revolution in Cairo”) and Charles Sennott of GlobalPost (“Revolution in Cairo”) examine the rise and rapid fall of Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood.

With unique access to the Brotherhood’s leadership, "Frontline" follows the Islamist movement as it plots its next move.

Photo: Protesters in Cairo march in support of ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, who won Egypt’s first free and fair elections in June 2012, but was overthrown by the military a year later. Credit: Courtesy of Mosa'ab Elshamy